Scholarly vs Polar Essay: A1 Graded B

Scholarly vs Polar Essay: A1 Graded B - Professor Hill...

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Professor Hill Section 108 5 February 2007 Assignment 1 What’s the Difference: Scholarly Versus Popular Through a constant connection to a vast array of online information many types of writing are available to suit every occasion in mere seconds. In particular, popular and scholarly articles are both common and informational, although very different. Jeffrey K. Taubenberger’s article, Integrating Historical, Clinical and Molecular Genetic Data in order to Explain the Origin and Virulence of the 1918 Spanish Influenza Virus exemplifies the components of a scholarly article. On the other hand, Jamie Shreeve’s article, Why Revive a Deadly Flue Virus? , illustrates precisely how a popular article might read. Components of an article like title, format, and content help distinguish a scholarly article from a popular article. Taubenberger’s scholarly article has a descriptive, specific and lengthy title, Integrating Historical, Clinical and Molecular Genetic Data in order to Explain the Origin and Virulence of the 1918 Spanish Influenza Virus . The title immediately informs the reader that Taubenberger’s article is not light reading. Furthermore, the title illustrates the article will go into depth concerning each area (historical, clinical, molecular, data, origin, and virulence) of the 1918 Spanish Influenza Virus. The title is a way for the author to give a reader an idea of whether or not his or her article contains information pertinent to the reader’s unique necessity. This particular title utilized by Taubenberger
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indicates the subjects his article entails are evaluated strictly on historical and factual data rather than his individual opinion. The popular article by Jamie Shreeve, Why Revive a Deadly Flu Virus? , uses a title designed to get a reader’s attention. By utilizing a short and inquisitive heading, the reader instantly wants to know exactly why would someone want to stimulate a fatal virus known to cause a pandemic. A popular article’s goal is often to ‘catch’ the reader and to entertain the reader while persuading him or her. Shreeve’s title offers a quick glimpse of what he will be discussing. At the same time the title, Why Revive a Deadly Flu Virus? , also implies the author will attempt to persuade the reader that either it should or should not be revived. Upon first glance, format of Taubenberger’s article stands out when placed adjacent to Shreeve’s popular article. Each section of Taubenberger’s article is distinguished by a title. The enumerated titles for each section are unobtrusive, but functional, each specifically identifies the subject of each category. Taubenberger’s
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2008 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Cornett during the Spring '08 term at N.C. State.

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Scholarly vs Polar Essay: A1 Graded B - Professor Hill...

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