After his clash with the bosses of Tammany Hall

After his clash with the bosses of Tammany Hall - After his...

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Unformatted text preview: After his clash with the bosses of Tammany Hall, FDR knew that his political career in New York was temporarily halted. He therefore threw his energies into supporting Woodrow Wilson for the next presidential election, hoping that his support would bear fruit in the form of an appointment. It was in his efforts to campaign for Wilson in early 1912 that he gave a speech in Troy that hinted at the political beliefs that would resurface as the New Deal. According to one biographer, Nathan Miller, FDR's speech was a "carefully worded assault" on private property when its use conflicted with public welfare. Although naïve and superficial, the speech was the first inkling of the impulses that would guide the first years of FDR's presidency, and challenges the claims of critics that he had no real political beliefs or agenda. In June of 1912, Teddy Roosevelt lost to that he had no real political beliefs or agenda....
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This note was uploaded on 12/14/2011 for the course HIST 2320 taught by Professor Siegenthaler during the Fall '07 term at Texas State.

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