As Europe -...

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As Europe's intellectuals gaped, the Catholic Church squirmed. They were long  accustomed to the comforting ideas of Aristotle and Ptolemy, which assumed a  crystalline, unchanging universe–a creation befitting an all-powerful God. The flux and  change that Galileo now revealed bespoke a more chaotic system, a less-than-godly  lack of organization. But for a time it seemed that disagreement would not necessarily  lead to condemnation. Galileo made a triumphant journey to Rome in 1611, where he  stayed with the Jesuit astronomers, who confirmed his observations in almost every  particular. He received the blessing of Pope Paul VI, and more importantly, one of the  Pope's advisers actually agreed to look through the telescope. This was Cardinal Robert  Bellarmine: a great intellectual, Bellarmine had friends in common with Galileo, and had  studied astronomy in his youth. However, the cardinal had also crusaded ardently against heresy, and sixteen years 
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This note was uploaded on 12/14/2011 for the course HIST 2320 taught by Professor Siegenthaler during the Fall '07 term at Texas State.

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