Brücke was a physiologist from the strictly physicalist school that had first arisen

Brücke was a physiologist from the strictly physicalist school that had first arisen

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Brücke was a physiologist from the strictly physicalist school that had first arisen with  Freud's father's generation. Brücke and others argued that special "vital" forces were not  necessary to explain life; rather, all biological phenomena could be explained by  reference to basic physical laws, even if–as was certainly the case in Brücke's and  Freud's time–the connection to those laws was not apparent. As a physiologist, Brücke  was concerned with the function of particular cells and organs, not just with their  structure. Brücke's work thus focused on the attempt to discover basic physical laws that  governed the processes that took place in living systems. When Freud formulated his theories of psychoanalysis in the 1890s, he abandoned the  physicalism of Brücke's position, but retained the search for universal laws and the  emphasis on processes, or dynamics. ("Psychodynamic psychology" is a modern term 
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This note was uploaded on 12/14/2011 for the course HIST 2320 taught by Professor Siegenthaler during the Fall '07 term at Texas State.

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