Despite enjoying the honors bestowed upon him by the Venetian Senate

Despite enjoying the honors bestowed upon him by the Venetian Senate

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Despite enjoying the honors bestowed upon him by the Venetian Senate, Galileo  continued to negotiate for a new appointment in Florence, where his former pupil, Prince  Cosimo de Medici, had become Grand Duke Cosimo II. When, in March 1610, he  published his discovery of the lunar surface and the moons of Jupiter in a Latin treatise  entitled  Sidereus Nuncius , or "The Starry Messenger," he went so far as to dedicate the  work to Cosimo, and even named the newly discovered moons the "Medicean Stars,"  after the Medici family. Galileo was soon rewarded for his efforts at wooing the powerful  family: in June of 1610, he gained appointment as "First Mathematician of the University  of Pisa, and First Mathematician and Philosopher to the Grand Duke," as well as a  sizable annual salary, and exemption from the obligation to teach classes. He  abandoned Venice and Padua for Florence and Pisa without a backward glance–ending 
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This note was uploaded on 12/14/2011 for the course HIST 2320 taught by Professor Siegenthaler during the Fall '07 term at Texas State.

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