Early in May of 1935

Early in May of 1935 -...

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Early in May of 1935, businessmen speaking at the United States Chamber of  Commerce, in their first collective and overt attack on Roosevelt's policies, denounced  New Deal policies as restrictive to capitalism. The rich felt that Roosevelt was a traitor to  his class, reacting to his leftist rhetoric rather than to his actual deeds in office. A few  weeks later, on May 27, a day the New Dealers later called Black Monday, the Supreme  Court declared the NRA and some other New Deal legislation to be unconstitutional,  saying that Congress had exceeded its authority in creating codes for industries  unrelated to interstate commerce. These failures goaded Roosevelt to push the next  series of legislation through Congress, which he passed during the Second Hundred  Days and which was later termed the Second New Deal. A number of long lasting acts  came out of this second wave of legislation, among them the National Labor Relations 
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This note was uploaded on 12/14/2011 for the course HIST 2320 taught by Professor Siegenthaler during the Fall '07 term at Texas State.

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