Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser - Edmund Spenser, whose patron was none...

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Unformatted text preview: Edmund Spenser, whose patron was none other than Leicester himself, often drew from the lives of the big celebrities of the day as subject matter for his poems. In a 1579 poem, for instance, he subtly hints at Leicester's secret marriage to Elizabeth's cousin, Lettice Knollys. Spenser's famous Faerie Queene contains multiple references to Elizabeth, who appears allegorically as several characters, including the Faerie Queene herself. Other international figures, including Philip II, Alencon, Mary Queen of Scots, and Leicester are represented as well. It may seem odd that the Mayor of London so opposed the theater houses: in our own day, drama is considered a bastion of high culture; indeed, many people prefer TV or movies, as they contain more "action," more sensation and excitement; why would anyone want to ban the comparatively staid and civilized genre of theatrical drama? In anyone want to ban the comparatively staid and civilized genre of theatrical drama?...
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Edmund Spenser - Edmund Spenser, whose patron was none...

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