Elizabeth quickly consolidated power and returned the country to Protestantism

Elizabeth quickly consolidated power and returned the country to Protestantism

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Elizabeth quickly consolidated power and returned the country to Protestantism, passing  the Acts of Supremacy and Uniformity, although by Reformation standards Catholics  fared well under these acts. With the help of able advisors like Sir William Cecil (later  Lord Burleigh) and the spy-networks of Francis Walsingham, she ruled the country ably  and initiated an era of economic prosperity. In international affairs, Elizabeth  manipulated the princes of Europe, using the prospect of marriage to her (and thus joint  control over England) as a bargaining tool; indeed, preferring the power that came with  perpetual eligibility, she ultimately never married at all. She was, however, involved in a  scandalous romance with Robert Dudley (later called the Earl of Leicester), her Master  of the Horse. Because Elizabeth was both husbandless and childless, to overthrow her would be to 
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This note was uploaded on 12/14/2011 for the course HIST 2320 taught by Professor Siegenthaler during the Fall '07 term at Texas State.

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