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It may seem odd that the Mayor of London so opposed the theater houses

It may seem odd that the Mayor of London so opposed the theater houses

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It may seem odd that the Mayor of London so opposed the theater houses: in our own  day, drama is considered a bastion of high culture; indeed, many people prefer TV or  movies, as they contain more "action," more sensation and excitement; why would  anyone want to ban the comparatively staid and civilized genre of theatrical drama? In  the Elizabethan age, however, plays  were  the TV or movies of the time. In a day when  there was not much entertainment, drama provided one of the few avenues of diversion  and was wildly popular. Because the lower-class masses were illiterate, plays appealed  especially to them. Thus, tension over the theaters revolved around a class conflict: the  well-to-do middle class, obsessed with hard work and religion, hated plays, viewing  them as a source of idleness. Moreover, because the lower classes often skipped 
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  • Fall '07
  • Siegenthaler
  • Elizabeth, inappropriate behavior, modern United States, English culture. Elizabeth, Elizabethan middle classes, well­to­do middle class

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