It was at the end of the war that Roosevelt learned from Wilson his greatest political lesson

It was at the end of the war that Roosevelt learned from Wilson his greatest political lesson

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It was at the end of the war that Roosevelt learned from Wilson his greatest political  lesson. He watched as Wilson, now a frail old man, tried and failed to gain the country's  approval for the formation of the League of Nations. FDR understood that foreign policy  could not be successful if based only on partisan support. This understanding would  prove crucial in Roosevelt's handling of the end of World War II. On July 1920, Roosevelt was nominated to run for Vice President on James Cox's ticket.  Although Cox was fearful of objections from Tammany Hall, Boss Murphy held off all  opposition. FDR officially accepted the nomination on August 9, 1920, emphasizing in  his acceptance speech what would become the themes of the campaign. He spoke  about the need for reorganization of the federal government to increase its efficiency 
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Unformatted text preview: and the need for American participation in the League of Nations. He embarked on a vigorous nationwide campaign, speaking in thirty-eight states in three months. Though crowds everywhere supported FDR, they would not support Cox and certainly would not support the League of Nations. After such bloody involvement with the rest of the world, all many Americans wanted was to close their eyes to the world beyond the oceans. The country cloaked itself in isolationism, a mood that would last till the attack on Pearl Harbor almost two decades later. Because this was the first election in which women voted, Eleanor accompanied her husband everywhere on the campaign trail....
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