Letters from his daughter Virginia

Letters from his daughter Virginia - Letters from his...

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Unformatted text preview: Letters from his daughter Virginia–now the deeply pious Sister Maria Celeste–urged him to submit to God's will, and the first cracks appeared in Galileo's armor. On April 30, he confessed to having been too prideful in this Dialogue, and having stated the Copernican case too strongly; he offered to write a hundred additional pages to correct this difficulty. This suggestion was a fantasy, but authorities permitted him to return to the Tuscan embassy. On May 10, the Inquisition examined him again, and now he begged for mercy, asking his judges to consider his advanced age and take pity on him. Everyone now wanted a speedy resolution to the matter, but somehow it dragged on into June, when the Inquisition finally broke its famous prisoner: they declared him guilty of heresy and promised mercy only on the condition that he renounce his errors;...
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Letters from his daughter Virginia - Letters from his...

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