Many Americans came to trust Franklin as their advocate in Britain

Many Americans came to trust Franklin as their advocate in Britain

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Unformatted text preview: Many Americans came to trust Franklin as their advocate in Britain. They saw him as someone who could help Britain and America work out their differences in a positive way. They were wrong. In the 1770s, even after helping to defeat the Stamp Act and (later) the Townsend Acts, Franklin grew frustrated with the British leaders' ignorance of America and condescending attitude toward the colonies. He wrote more essays denouncing British policies toward America, including his famous "Rules By Which a Great Empire May Be Reduced to a Small One" and "An Edict by the King of Prussia" (both in September 1773). Though Franklin's reputation as an American patriot was growing, his credibility was about to suffer. In Massachusetts, anti-British sentiment was on the rise. Radicals there believed that Britain was bent on their destruction. Franklin hoped the colonists in believed that Britain was bent on their destruction....
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This note was uploaded on 12/14/2011 for the course HIST 2320 taught by Professor Siegenthaler during the Fall '07 term at Texas State.

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