Meanwhil4 - Meanwhile, political developments gave Galileo...

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Unformatted text preview: Meanwhile, political developments gave Galileo reason for a new optimism. September 1621 saw the death of Galileo's old nemesis, Cardinal Bellarmine. In January of that year, Pope Paul V had died as well, being replaced by the elderly Gregory XV, who passed away in turn in June of 1623. His successor was Urban VIII, a liberal churchman with a bent for science and a special fondness for Galileo. At home in Bellosguardo, Galileo rejoiced at the election, and quickly dedicated "The Assayer" to the new Pope, who allowed it to be published and reportedly roared with laughter at Galileo's verbal tweaking of the Jesuits. Heartened, Galileo journeyed to Rome in April of 1624, and received warm welcome from Urban, who loaded him with gifts and praisebut refused to lift the Inquisition's ban on the Copernican theory. He and Galileo sparred over the issue, and his arguments seem to have stuck in Galileo's...
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Meanwhil4 - Meanwhile, political developments gave Galileo...

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