One of the most heinous side effects of the depression was the rise of the Nazis in Germany and Aust

One of the most heinous side effects of the depression was the rise of the Nazis in Germany and Aust

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Unformatted text preview: One of the most heinous side effects of the depression was the rise of the Nazis in Germany and Austria. In 1933, Hitler became chancellor of Germany. Many book- burning sprees took place in Berlin and around the country following Hitler's assumption of power, and Freud's books were particularly popular fuel for the flames. Freud commented astutely in one of his letters at the time that the persecution of the Jews was probably the only one of Hitler's many promises to the German people that could be successfully carried out. Freud did not, however, know how terribly accurate his assessment would be. Throughout the 1930s, Freud refused to believe that he would be forced to leave Vienna because of anti-Semitic persecution. Despite the rising tension caused by the Nazi takeover of Germany, Freud's 80th birthday, on May 6, 1956, was widely celebrated. Freud's position as an elder statesman birthday, on May 6, 1956, was widely celebrated....
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