The British public were nearly as horrified as their Indian subjects

The British public were nearly as horrified as their Indian subjects

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Unformatted text preview: The British public were nearly as horrified as their Indian subjects. Dyer resigned in disgrace, and the London government repudiated his conduct vociferously. But the damage had been done. The Amritsar Massacre had the effect of pushing moderate Indian politicians, like Gandhi, toward outright rebellion, and it created a climate of hostility between British and Indians that would fester throughout the twenty-five-year march to independence. The old ideal of a benevolent, liberal British Empire lay shattered. After many delays, the British finally allowed Gandhi to make his way to Amritsar. All along his journey, cheering crowds greeted his progress; once he arrived at the site of the massacre, he commenced his own investigation into the events of April 13. The report, when it was finally produced months later, differed little from the official account...
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The British public were nearly as horrified as their Indian subjects

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