The conviction that physical diseases of the brain caused mental illness meant that psychological ca

The conviction that physical diseases of the brain caused mental illness meant that psychological ca

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Unformatted text preview: The conviction that physical diseases of the brain caused mental illness meant that psychological causes–the kinds that Freud would insist on studying–were ignored. It also meant that people drew a sharp dividing line between the "insane" and the "sane." Insane people were those with physical diseases of the brain. Sane people were those without diseased brains. Freud changed all of this. Despite his background in physicalism (learned during his stay in Ernst Brücke's laboratory), his theories explicitly rejected the purely organic explanations of his predecessors. One of Freud's biggest influences during his early days as a neurologist was Jean-Martin Charcot, the famous French psychiatrist. Charcot claimed that hysteria had primarily organic causes, and that it had a regular, comprehensible pattern of symptoms. Freud agreed with Charcot on the latter point, but comprehensible pattern of symptoms....
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