The most complex product of the Hundred Days Congress was the National Industry Recovery Act

The most complex product of the Hundred Days Congress was the National Industry Recovery Act

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The most complex product of the Hundred Days Congress was the National Industry  Recovery Act, which was meant to help labor, industry, and the unemployed. Although  Roosevelt insisted in his second fireside chat that the Act was only a partnership  between business and industry and the national government, this legislation intruded  into business far more than ever before. The bill was finally passed on June 16, 1933,  after objections from the Senate, which insisted that the bill would only promote the  concentration of wealth and power. Hugh Johnson was chosen to run the National  Recovery Administration, or NRA, which was to administer the Act. The bill called for  individual industries to write up codes of fair competition, decided maximum hours of  labor per person, and introduced minimum wages in order to spread work among the  greatest number of people. Labor was granted the right to collectively bargain and the 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/14/2011 for the course HIST 2320 taught by Professor Siegenthaler during the Fall '07 term at Texas State.

Page1 / 2

The most complex product of the Hundred Days Congress was the National Industry Recovery Act

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online