The three years after his wife

The three years - The three years after his wife's death were a time of struggle against what Gandhi saw as an impending catastrophe–the

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The three years after his wife's death were a time of struggle against what Gandhi saw as an impending catastrophe–the partition of India. As World War II wound to an end, Jinnah was pushing for an independent Muslim state, a "Pakistan," an idea that Gandhi found utterly unacceptable. The Muslim population was concentrated in the northwest and extreme east of India, but there was no clear line of demarcation, and Hindus and Muslims lived side by side in most regions. In a series of long, impassioned exchanges with Jinnah in 1944 and '45, both in person and by letter, Gandhi argued that partition would inevitably lead to violence and forced migration. But Jinnah held firm. In 1945 Churchill lost the British elections and the left-wing Labour party came to power, determined to push Indian independence through and rid themselves of a subcontinent...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 12/14/2011 for the course HIST 2320 taught by Professor Siegenthaler during the Fall '07 term at Texas State.

Page1 / 2

The three years - The three years after his wife's death were a time of struggle against what Gandhi saw as an impending catastrophe–the

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online