The war was started by the assassination of the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo

The war was started by the assassination of the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo

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The war was started by the assassination of the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand in  Sarajevo, Serbia, on June 28, 1914, by a Bosnian who was a member of a group of  Serbian nationalists. The rulers of the Austro-Hungarian Empire decided to retaliate by  punishing the Serbs, but this quickly drew the opposition of Western European powers  such as France and England. Soon almost all of Europe was involved in the conflict.  The war lasted for four years and involved horrific casualties on both sides, in part  because of the use of new technologies such as automobiles and poison gas. Freud  was too old to fight, but his three sons, Martin, Oliver, and Ernst, were all drafted. They  were occasionally in difficult straits; Martin, for instance, spent a great deal of time in an  Italian prisoner of war camp. Still, they all came out mostly unharmed.
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This note was uploaded on 12/14/2011 for the course HIST 2320 taught by Professor Siegenthaler during the Fall '07 term at Texas State.

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