This isolationist mood of the country was a large reason why Roosevelt failed to involve the United

This isolationist mood of the country was a large reason why Roosevelt failed to involve the United

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This isolationist mood of the country was a large reason why Roosevelt failed to involve  the United States in World War II in a timely manner. Roosevelt's experience as  Assistant Secretary of the Navy had proven his interventionist beliefs correct once, and  his actions in the beginning of WWII reveal a similar sentiment in him then. In July of  1937, Japan invaded China, but the lack of a formal declaration of war allowed FDR to  continue arms sales to China despite Neutrality legislation. He delivered a speech in  Chicago in the autumn of 1937–the "Quarantine Speech"–that called for "positive  endeavors" against the aggressions of Italy and Japan, something along the lines of  economic embargoes. But faced with an uproar of isolationist protest, the ever politically  conscious Roosevelt backed down from his interventionist beliefs. Roosevelt had 
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