When Freud formulated his theories of psychoanalysis in the 1890s

When Freud formulated his theories of psychoanalysis in the 1890s

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
When Freud formulated his theories of psychoanalysis in the 1890s, he abandoned the  physicalism of Brücke's position, but retained the search for universal laws and the  emphasis on processes, or dynamics. ("Psychodynamic psychology" is a modern term  that refers to Freud's theories of psychology and others like it that describe the mind in  terms of dynamic interactions between different mental structures.) Freud's later focus  on the sex drive can be seen, in two ways, as a result of his study under Brücke. First,  the focus was a nod to physicalism–an attempt to link the vicissitudes of the mind to  changes in the body (i.e. sexual arousal). Second, it was a strongly reductionistic  approach–an attempt to boil down the huge complexity of human motivation into one  basic drive. In Brücke's laboratory, Freud worked on brain anatomy and histology. His most 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online