Geological Basis of Geomorphology

Geological Basis of Geomorphology - Geological Basis of...

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Geological Basis of Geomorphology Diastrophism (Gr: dia (across), strophe (turn)) can be up to 10X more rapid then rates of erosion e.g. Alaskan earthquake, 1964: 8 m of uplift in a few minutes New Guinea: long-term uplift of 2000 m/ million years Postglacial uplift (glaciotectonism): 20,000 m/million years 1. Orogenesis (Gr. oros: mountain) o folding and faulting o occurs along destructive plate margins by crustal shortening and compression and thus in long narrow belts o associated with volcanoes and earthquakes (e.g. the circum-Pacific orogenic belt) 2. Epeirogenesis (Gr. epeiros: continent) o uniform, widespread crustal deformation with little or no faulting or folding o isostasy: the equilibrium maintained by crustal blocks because with increasing depth crustal rocks are denser and denser; therefore they subside with increasing mass (e.g. sedimentation or glaciation) and rebound with decreasing mass (e.g. deglaciation or erosion)
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course GLY GLY100 taught by Professor Jaymuza during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Geological Basis of Geomorphology - Geological Basis of...

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