Session_13--EOL_Fall_2011

Session_13--EOL_Fall_2011 - TeacherContractsandUnions

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Teacher Contracts and Unions  On-Line Session!!! Post response to  MOODLE EOL—Fall 2011 Session 13 Dr. Ali Lewis
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Collective Bargaining Collective bargaining is the process of voluntary negotiation  between employers and a union aimed at reaching agreements  to regulate working conditions. Collective bargaining shapes the way public schools are  organized, financed, staffed and operated. Many states require  school boards and unions to bargain on: wages, hours, and  terms and conditions of employment. Having a general understanding of collective bargaining in  education and its impact on the day-to-day life of schools is  important – especially as we design and implement reforms  that can successfully raise student achievement.
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Collective Bargaining, Background In 1935 Congress passed the National Labor  Relations Act (Wagner Act), which guarantees  the right of private employees to form and join  unions to bargain collectively.  The vast majority of states have extended this  right to public employees, including teachers at  public school districts.
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Constitutional Considerations Regarding Unions The Constitution does not grant teachers the  right to bargain collectively with employers.  This  right is based on provisions in state constitutions  or statues. Similarly, teachers do not have a constitutional  right to strike, though other federal and state  laws may permit teachers to strike.
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Comparisons--Examples of Collective  Bargaining in Illinois v. Texas ILLINOIS is an example of a state where teachers  as public employees have the right to join  teacher’s unions and collectively bargain. TEXAS is an example of a state which prohibits 
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Session_13--EOL_Fall_2011 - TeacherContractsandUnions

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