401-11-M-SpecialNeeds - Brooke Horvath Rachel Kluber Bobby...

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Unformatted text preview: Brooke Horvath Rachel Kluber Bobby Till CI 401 M What
is
the
topic?
   Least restricted environment for students who have special needs (special education, “gifted,” etc.)   Dealing with students who have individualized education programs (IEPs)   Integrating the math classroom   Not separating into separate classes for math   Dealing with an aide, paraprofessional, or special education teacher in your math classroom What
is
the
topic?
(cont’d)
   Figuring out where special education needs improvement and where it is lacking   Teachers becoming part of the solution   Retesting is not learning   Triage Testing   “not needing immediate care, critically wounded, hopeless” (Chavez, 2004). Why
is
this
topic
“hot?”
   NCLB Standards (also ISAT, Discover, etc.)   “People are making decisions without really thinking about the impact” (Hoffman, 2009).   Special needs students are a “subgroup”   Wider spectrum and broad diagnoses   Response to Intervention (RtI)   Intervening with “struggling” students   Differentiating in the classroom   Different skill levels in the same room Why
is
the
topic
“hot?”
(cont’d)
   Push to learn math more quickly rather than deeply   The “race to reach BC Calculus first is evident in the high school curricula” (Rothery, 2008).   Teaching to the test   Parents pushing for best for their children   Not always a positive...   “[Lack of understanding] of the issues of math and science, [but] solely worried about test scores” (Hoffman and Caniglia, 2009). Clicker
Ques;on
#1
   What is the best way to handle a student with special needs in the math classroom? A. Give the student any resources or materials they want B. Let the Special Ed. Teacher deal with the student C. Treat them as an ordinary student D. Give them altered assignments E. Ignore the situation/ let them do other work • Challenge as a teacher is how to appeal to each individual student if they are learning at different levels. • It is even more important in a mathematics classroom for three important reasons: 1) Pace 2) Depth of understanding 3) Interest •  Ongoing debate as to whether a teacher has the skills and knowledge to teach students with special needs. Issues
cont.

   When teaching an academically diverse classroom, we need to not ask what labels do my students have, but what are their particular interests and needs?   We seek equity and excellence when we allow for the classroom to include special education students.   Need to have high expectations for all students that challenge their intellectual minds. What
Research
Shows…
   Principles for teaching a diverse classroom:   Good curriculum comes first   Challenge Learners   Use flexible grouping   Assessment   Grade to reflect growth   In Pennsylvania, there is a program in which special education students are exceeding in the regular classroom.   School developed an Instructional Support Team (IST)   IST helps schools create a seamless system of support for students and teachers   Parent participation is important What
year
did
the
law
pass
for
 inclusion
of
special
educa;on
 students?
 A.  1980 B.  1966 C.  1975 D.  1997 The
Best
Related
Prac;ce
   “The challenge for teachers lies in applying this principle [equity] to daily classroom practice.” (Brodesky, 2004)   Planning is the best practice when developing good math lessons for all students in the classroom.   Step 1: Focus on the mathematics   Step 2: Focus on the students   Step 3: Identify Barriers   Step 4: Brainstorm Accessibility Strategies   Step 5: Share the Accessibility Strategies   Step 6: Plan follow‐up actions   (Brodesky, 2004) The
Best
Related
Prac;ce
(cont)
   The practice is not meant to separate special needs students from the class but rather make teachers more prepared to teach special needs students along with the rest   The Accessibility Strategies Plan can be used when teaching with an aide or paraprofessional.   Focuses on understanding rather than testing   (Brodesky, 2004) The
Best
Related
Prac;ce
(cont)
   When working with special needs students, staff at the Education Development Center (2007) suggests the following:   Help students understand tasks   Help students access math in varied ways   Build student independence   Provide tools and handouts   Promote understanding through discourse   Help students manage tasks and organization   Adjust tasks to student needs   Create a supportive environment This
is
important
to
our
future
 teaching!

   Our future classrooms will be diverse. We will encounter a lot of students who learn differently, especially those students with special needs.   Number of special need students in federally supported school programs has risen from about 8% in 1975 to 13% by 2009, and continues to rise. This directly affects the way our classrooms will be managed as public educators. (“Fast Facts”, 2011)   We need to find a way to prepare lessons that are meaningful to all students in some way   We will teach in classrooms containing students with IEPs and paraprofessionals. We need to be aware of tools to utilize all of our resources   “The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), enacted in 1975, mandates that children and youth ages 3–21 with disabilities be provided a free and appropriate public school education” (“Fast Facts”, 2011) Key word: appropriate. Clicker
Ques;on
#3
 On the first day of class, you discover that you have a couple students in your class with special needs, as well as a classroom aide to help you manage your classroom. How do you react? A. Expect the classroom aide to work separately with the special needs students on a lesson plan that you provide B. Expect the classroom aide to work separately with the special needs students on lesson plans that he/she creates C. Expect the aide to work alongside students while you perform your normal planned lesson D. Work with the classroom aide to develop an Accessibility Strategies Plan to be followed alongside the rest of the class during lessons E. None of the above Bibliography
   Brodesky, A., Gross, F., McTigue, A., & Palmer A. Instructional Strategies to Increase                 Accessibility. Education Development Center, Inc. 2007. Web. 3 Dec. 2011. Brodesky, A., Gross F., McTigue, A., & Tierney C. (2004). Planning strategies for students with special needs: A professional development activity. Teaching Children Mathematics, 11(3), 146‐154. Caniglia, J., & Hoffman, E. S. (2009). In their own words: Good mathematics teachers in the era of nclb. Mathematics Teacher, 102(6), 472. Chavez, S. (2004). If at first you don't succeed.. test, test again (not!). Mathematics Teacher, 97(5), 310‐312. “Fast Facts”. Digest of Educational Statistics. U.S. Department of Education, 2011. Web. 3 Dec. 2011. Johnson, D. T. (2000, April). Teaching mathematics to gifted students in a mixed‐ability classroom. Retrieved from http://www.teachervision.fen.com/gifted‐education/teaching‐ methods/3778.html Kovaleski, J., Tucker, J. & Stevens, L. (1996, February ). Bridging special education: The pennsylvania initiative Educational Leadership, 53(5), 44‐47. Retrieved from http:// www.ascd.org/publications/educational‐leadership/feb96/vol53/num05/Bridging‐Special‐ and‐Regular‐[email protected]‐The‐Pennsylvania‐Initiative.aspx Rothery, T. G. (2008). High school mathematics: Why the rush?. Mathematics Teacher, 102(5), 325. Tomlinson, C. (2003, October). Deciding to teach them all. Educational Leadership , 61(2), 6‐11. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational‐leadership/oct03/vol61/ num02/Deciding‐to‐Teach‐Them‐All.aspx ...
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