403-M2-CulturallyRelevant - Charles Vokes Tyler Sendt Marc...

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Charles Vokes Tyler Sendt Marc Szulc-Cieplicki
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Culturally Relevant Mathematics Our country is becoming more and more diverse and the ways in which we teach mathematics may need to change with that. Sometimes it can be difficult to reach students of different backgrounds then your own. So, today we are going to discuss the importance of culturally relevant mathematics classrooms, and how we can have lessons which can be culturally relevant to all students.
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Racial, ethnic, and linguistic demographics have shown a great amount of growth. Over the past three decades, the racial and ethnic backgrounds have drastically changed. 1972 22% Minority in K-12 schools 2003 41% Minority in K-12 schools Department of Education Website gives the following information: In 2009, the Demographics of US schools is: White – 53.7% Black – 16.6% Hispanic – 22.0% Asian/Pacific Islander – 4.9% American Indian – 1.3%
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No Child Left Behind breaks down schools into 10 subgroups. All subgroups must meet AYP or the school is considered ‘failing AYP’. Five subgroups are ethnic (American Indian, Asian, Hispanic, Black, and White). It is important for teachers to ensure all their students are taking in and retaining knowledge.
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Understanding the cultural experiences of students is becoming more and more important because of the increasing differences of the demographics of American students and their teachers. “Roughly 80 percent of American teachers are white, while children of color make up more than 40 percent of the student body” (Scruggs, 2009). In order to be the most effective, teachers have to learn about and use the cultural experiences of their students as a foundation for their teaching. So, teachers who claim to be colorblind need to take the blinders off.
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Many teachers think that culturally relevant pedagogy involves simply acknowledging ethnic holidays or including popular culture in the curriculum. Most
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  • Fall '11
  • Poetzel
  • VILLEGAS, Identity Development Among Diverse High School Students, Classroom. Teaching Children Mathematics, culturally relevant mathematics

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