A3 Final draft B

A3 Final draft B - Horror Running head HORROR 1"The Nature of Horror A Summary in APA Style North Carolina State University Horror 2 In Noel

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Horror 1 Running head: HORROR “The Nature of Horror”: A Summary in APA Style North Carolina State University
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Horror 2 In Noel Carroll’s article, The Nature of Horror , published by The Journal of Aesthetics and Arts Criticism (1997), he discusses the response to and role of art-horror in past fifteen years. Carroll theorizes that art-horror is an emotional and physical state manifested through flashes of fear and disgust in a characters response to a monster. Carroll’s theory is well supported through the use of examples and logic, and when applied to my own experiences it is exceptionally accurate. Noel Carroll begins his evaluation of art-horror by addressing the increasing popularity of horror in the past decade. According to Carroll (1997), horror has “flourished as a major source of mass aesthetic stimulation” through the production of postmodern novels, films, plays, and fine art (p.51). Art- horror refers to the effects of a genre beginning around the time period of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and has endured through novels and films of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (Carroll, 1997, p.51). Carroll’s definition of a horrifying monster within his article is pertinent to triggering the art-horror emotion. Monsters become monsters in context – one must reference the reactions of characters as well as the monster itself. Monsters are only monstrous when impure, and while Carroll (1998) acknowledges impurity as vague, he gives it parameters of “the transgression or violation of schemes of cultural categorization” (p.56). Carroll exemplifies the flying squirrel as impure and avoided because it does not fit either into the category of bird or animal. In the same way, monsters often fall into an area
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Horror 3 that cannot be categorized, often neither dead nor alive. This is part of the reason coupled with disgusting features – rotting flesh, oozing, shapeless, or detached – characters react to monsters in way that is mirrored by an audience. Carroll also addresses that it takes more than the presence of a ‘monster’
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This essay was uploaded on 04/06/2008 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Cornett during the Spring '08 term at N.C. State.

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A3 Final draft B - Horror Running head HORROR 1"The Nature of Horror A Summary in APA Style North Carolina State University Horror 2 In Noel

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