arxiv0403015_dawson

arxiv0403015_dawson - 4 Oct 2004 14:16 AR AR228-NS54-09.tex...

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Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 2004. 54:269–314 doi: 10.1146/annurev.nucl.54.070103.181259 Copyright c ° 2004 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved P HYSICS O PPORTUNITIES WITH A T E VL INEAR C OLLIDER Sally Dawson 1 and Mark Oreglia 2 1 Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973; email: dawson@bnl.gov 2 The Enrico Fermi Institute, Chicago, Illinois 60637; email: oreglia@hep.uchicago.edu KeyWords electron-positron annihilation, Higgs, supersymmetry PACS Codes 13.66.–a, 14.80.–j Abstract We discuss the physics motivations for building a 500 GeV–1 TeV electron-positron linear collider. The state-of-the-art collider technologies and the physics-driven machine parameters are discussed. Some of the phenomena well suited to study at a linear collider are described, including Higgs bosons, supersymmetry, other extensions to the standard model, and cosmology. CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION ................................................... 270 1.1. The Legacy of LEP and SLC ....................................... 270 1.2. New Realities and Possibilities ...................................... 272 1.3. A Roadmap for High-Energy Physics ................................ 272 1.4. Physics-Driven Accelerator Requirements ............................. 273 1.5. Technologies and Issues for a Linear Collider .......................... 275 1.6. Collision Options ................................................ 280 1.7. Detector Challenges .............................................. 281 2. HIGGS BOSONS 283 2.1. Producing the Higgs Boson at a Linear Collider ........................ 283 2.2. Measuring the Higgs Boson Couplings ............................... 284 2.3. Measuring the Higgs Boson Quantum Numbers 286 2.4. Higgs Spectroscopy in a Supersymmetric Model ....................... 286 3. SUPERSYMMETRY 288 3.1. Sleptons ........................................................ 290 3.2. Charginos and Neutralinos ......................................... 292 3.3. The Minimal Supergravity Model ................................... 293 3.4. Gauge-Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking ............................ 294 3.5. Extracting the Underlying Supersymmetry Parameters ................... 295 4. OTHER EXTENSIONS TO THE STANDARD MODEL .................... 296 4.1. Strongly Interacting Electroweak Symmetry Breaking 296 4.2. Top Mass Measurements .......................................... 298 4.3. Extra Dimensions 298 0163-8998/04/1208-0269$14.00 269 Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 2004.54:269-314. Downloaded from arjournals.annualreviews.org by UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA - Smathers Library on 05/01/09. For personal use only.
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270 DAWSON ¥ OREGLIA 5. THE LINEAR COLLIDER AND COSMOLOGY .......................... 302 5.1. The Linear Collider and Astrophysics ................................ 302 5.2. Dark Matter ..................................................... 304 5.3. Baryogenesis .................................................... 306 5.4. Dark Energy 308 6. CONCLUSIONS 308 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. The Legacy of LEP and SLC High-energy physics currently faces a greater opportunity than ever to address signiFcant questions about the structure of matter. The 1967 standard model (1) of electroweak uniFcation is consistent with experimental observations to accuracies better than 1 part in 10 3 , and yet it now raises more questions than it answers. The origin of the symmetry breaking that ultimately uniFes electromagnetism with the weak force has still not been found. There are theoretical blemishes in an otherwise elegant mathematical model; for example, the theoretical Higgs boson mass is unstable to radiative corrections, requiring a suspicious Fne-tuning of standard-model parameters in order to keep the Higgs boson light (2). And then there is the fact that astrophysical observations suggest an abundance of a new kind of matter. Many are convinced that we are poised for discoveries in the near term that will signiFcantly alter the physics landscape.
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arxiv0403015_dawson - 4 Oct 2004 14:16 AR AR228-NS54-09.tex...

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