lecture 17 - Behavioral Ecology

lecture 17 - Behavioral Ecology - Is Chivalry the Norm for...

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Is Chivalry the Norm for Insects? ScienceDaily (Oct. 7, 2011) — The long- standing consensus of why insects stick together after mating has been turned on its head by scientists from the University of Exeter. Published October 6 in Current Biology, their study shows that, contrary to previous thinking, females benefit from this arrangement just as much as males. Previously, scientists assumed that male insects stay close to females after mating to stop them from taking other partners. Female insects have multiple mates and the last mate is most likely to fertilise her eggs. Therefore, by preventing females from taking other mates a male is most likely to father her offspring. a female field cricket at the entrance of her burrow with the remains of her former partner after he was predated http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111006125406.htm
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Behavior
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Ecology is a sub-division of Biology (life-science) We can further divide it into four disciplines Behavioral ecology Population ecology Community ecology Ecosystems ecology
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Behavioral ecology Activity of life at the level of individuals Competition Predation Co-operation Social behavior
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Strange behaviors Octopus walking
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What about organisms other than animals Do plants have behavior? behavior = a response to a stimulus
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Plant behavior Plants respond to stimuli Instead of a nervous system, plants rely on hormone and cell signaling pathways Plants respond to stimuli like: Light Moisture Touch Gravity
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Plant behavior Plants respond to stimuli Instead of a nervous system, plants rely on hormone and cell signaling pathways Plants respond to stimuli like: Light Moisture Touch Gravity These responses may be slower than we are accustomed to considering
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On the other hand youtube: sensitive littleleaf mimosa
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thigmotropism
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Behaviors have costs and benefits Organisms have limited time and energy Energetic cost : Amount invested in doing an action vs. saved by not doing
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This note was uploaded on 12/16/2011 for the course BIO 201 taught by Professor True during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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lecture 17 - Behavioral Ecology - Is Chivalry the Norm for...

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