33-Competition-to-Predation

33-Competition-to-Predation - Fact of the day Where did all...

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Where did all the cool animals go? Fact of the day One of the great mysteries about North America is what killed off woolly mammoths and other exotic animals that roamed the land after the last ice age. Ideas have ranged from a comet impact and climate change to human hunters. A study published Friday in Science Magazine provides new clues about this — cleverly deduced from samples of a fungus that grew on the animals' dung. Was it Us? http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=120592967
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Where did all the cool animals go? Fact of the day http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/clovis/megafauna.html "By about 11,000 years ago, we lose about half of the animals in North America larger than the size of a German shepherd, and that's a pretty big ecological event," Gill says. The scientists study a certain species of fungus [that grows in dung], spores of which end up in lake sediments that date back some 15,000 years.
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Competition and coexistence
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Population Growth logistic growth N as before = population size K = carrying capacity = N * r (1 – ) N K Change in N over time
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Logistic growth – Testing assumptions – Early laboratory cultures (Pearl 1927)
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Competition ( - / - ) Multiple organisms or species trying to maximize their own use of a pool of resources that are often (but not always) limited.
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Niche Ecological niche: total of species abiotic and biotic resource use.
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realized fundamental niche realized niche realized niche – often smaller due to biotic limitations fundamental niche – defined by an organism’s abilites to live in a given abiotic environment
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This note was uploaded on 12/16/2011 for the course BIO 201 taught by Professor True during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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33-Competition-to-Predation - Fact of the day Where did all...

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