37-Ecosystems-and-Biodiversity

37-Ecosystems-and-Biodiversity - White-Nose Syndrome...

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http://www.fort.usgs.gov/wns/ http://www.fws.gov/whitenosesyndrome White-Nose Syndrome Threatens Survival of Hibernating Bats in North America During hibernation, a bat slows down its metabolism so that its body temperature remains just a few degrees above air temperature. This strategy allows a bat to consume very little fat over winter. Researchers in Europe have long noticed similar fungal growth on the faces, ears, and wings of hibernating bats in Europe, but observed no associated mortality. Work is currently underway to assess whether there is any connection between fungi seen on bats in North America and Europe. An alternative hypothesis for the origin of white-nose syndrome is that this fungus was already present in North America, yet recently mutated to become an emerging disease. Greater than a million have died, all 6 sp. suceptible, esp. Little Brown Bats
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Ecosystems Ecology - Studying the processes that maintain an ecosystem, which is a functioning biological area, often including multiple communities Ecosystem = a contained space or area of the Earth, including all of the organisms along with all the components of the abiotic environment Involves inputs and outputs of energy and material
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Where is an Ecosystem ?
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Ray Lindeman 1942 First Ecosystem model
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Eugene Odum 1953. Silver Springs, Florida.
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Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest
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• Time taken for a nutrient to pass through a complete cycle - 10-50 years • Inputs and outputs are small in comparison to pools
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This note was uploaded on 12/16/2011 for the course BIO 201 taught by Professor True during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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37-Ecosystems-and-Biodiversity - White-Nose Syndrome...

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