USGuidedBlocks-1 - Ultrasound Guided Ultrasound Guided...

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Unformatted text preview: Ultrasound Guided Ultrasound Guided Nerve Blocks: Raymond Graber, MD University Hospitals Case Medical Center Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine Goals: Goals: Discuss rationale for US guidance. Learn proper techniques of US guidance. Discuss interesting findings seen with US. Discuss specific nerve blocks. Landmark Technique For Landmark Technique For Nerve Blocks: Traditional nerve block techniques are based on the ability to palpate muscles, bones, and pulses. A normal consistent anatomic relationship between nerves and these other structures is assumed. Problems with Landmark Techniques: Problems with Landmark Techniques: Anatomic Variations There are normal variations in anatomy. Some patients have landmarks that are difficult to palpate. History of US Guidance History of US Guidance 1989: Ting et al used US to examine spread of local anesthetic after axillary blocks. 1994: Reed & Leighton used doppler to identify the axillary artery in an obese patient, and marked the skin prior to axillary block. 1994 (Kapral et al): supraclavicular blocks. 1998 ( Marhoffer): femoral blocks. Benefits of US Guidance Benefits of US Guidance Ability to see nearby vascular structures Ability to see nerves (sometimes!) Ability to visualize the needle approaching the nerve. Ability to see local anesthetic spread. Possibility of reducing complications. Can do postop without nerve stim. Less painful to use US instead of nerve stim when patient has a fracture. Can perform rescue blocks without nerve stim. Spread of Local: Spread of Local: US guidance has demonstrated one possible cause of patchy blocks – incomplete surrounding of the nerve with local anesthetic. If after half the volume of local is injected, inadequate spread is seen, the needle can be repositioned. How Accurate is Nerve Stimulation? How Accurate is Nerve Stimulation? We used to assume a linear relationship between the threshold stimulating current (the lowest current you can still achieve a twitch at) and the distance from the needle tip to the nerve. Many authors recommend a current of 0.2­0.5 ma as a goal. Higher threshold currents would lead to more searching with the needle. Lower currents would mean increased risk of intraneural injection. The 2 following studies called this dogma into question. In this study, interscalene blocks were done with paresthesia technique. Paresthesia is assumed to indicate contact with the nerve. When a paresthesia was obtained, the nerve stimulator was turned on. Results: All patients had easily elicited paresthesias… Only 30% of patients exhibited any motor response to electrical stimulation up to 1.0 mA… Conclusion: Elicitation of paresthesia does not translate to an ability to elicit a motor response to a peripheral nerve stimulator in the majority of patients. In this study, needles were placed into pig nerves, then nerve stim turned on to see at what current motor response occurred. Thus, intraneural placement occurred despite presumed “safe” nerve stim currents in 66% of the nerves. Demonstration of Intraneural Demonstration of Intraneural Injection with US: Does US Improve Success Rate? Does US Improve Success Rate? RAPM May­June 2008: US guidance improves success rate of interscalene brachial plexus blockade (99% vs 91%). (Kapral et al) US guidance improves the success of sciatic nerve block at the popliteal fossa (89.2% vs 60.6%). (Perlas et al) Both these studies allowed the US group to reposition to needle to ensure good spread of local anesthetic, whereas the nerve stim groups were singe injection. US Guided Nerve Blocks: US Guided Nerve Blocks: Equipment, Terminology & Technical Aspects The equipment is evolving. High resolution imaging is now available in laptop size equipment. The better the resolution, the easier it is to image nerves. Some equipment examples follow, but more systems are coming on the market. Sonosite 180+ Sonosite 180+ C11 Probe 11­mm broadband curved array transducer. Imaging modes: 2D, M­mode, color power Doppler, directional color power Doppler Physical characteristics: • • Maximum Depth: 10 cm • • Frequency: broadband 7­4 MHz Maximum Field of View: 90º Our original device – images hard to interpret. Good for IJ placements. Sonosite C11 Sonosite C11 HFL38 Probe 38 mm broadband flat array transducer. Imaging modes: 2D, M­mode, color power Doppler, directional color power Doppler Physical characteristics: • Frequency: broadband 10­ 5MHz • Maximum Depth: 6 cm GE 12L­RS GE 12L­RS US Probe 42 x 7 mm broadband flat array transducer. Imaging modes: 2D, M­mode, color Doppler, harmonic and compound imaging. Physical characteristics: • • Maximum Depth: 6­8 cm • • Frequency: 5­13 MHz Maximum width of View: 39 mm. Most of the images in this talk are from this device. Equipment & Supplies Equipment & Supplies Block kit. Needles – block, skin wheal Nerve stimulator Sterile sheath kit (contains gel, sleeve, rubber bands.) Local anesthetic US machine SAX Imaging SAX Imaging Most commonly used. LAX Imaging LAX Imaging Rarely used. SAX Out of Plane (OOP) Approach: SAX Out of Plane (OOP) Approach: Needle is at best seen only in cross section. More commonly, tissue movement is seen as the needle approaches the target. SAX In Plane (IP) Approach SAX In Plane (IP) Approach With this approach, one can see the needle approach the target. However, be aware that it is easy to be a little oblique, and to not actually see the needle tip. Needle Type: Needle Type: Typical 22 g insulated block needles can be used. Alternatively, 18 g Touhy needles sometimes are used, because are easier visualized, or for catheter placement. OOP approach: Needle diameter would not matter, since the needle is not visualized with this technique. IP approach: A larger diameter needle can be helpful, especially if the nerve is relatively deeper, and a longer needle is required. Technique (1) Technique (1) IP approach: line up needle in middle of US plane. Penetrate skin and enter under probe. If needle not seen, move probe slightly and slowly to find needle. Technique (2) Move needle to desired location. Inject 1 ml to verify needle location. Reposition needle if needed. Technique (3) Technique (3) Local Anesthetic Spread Examine spread of local. Reposition to next location if desired. With US guidance, is With US guidance, is nerve stimulation still required? As you get better with US, you rely less and less on nerve stim. However, may be advantageous to leave nerve stim on at low current for extra feedback on needle tip location. Femoral Nerve Block Femoral Nerve Block Femoral Nerve Femoral Nerve Origin: The femoral nerve is the largest branch of the lumbar plexus, and is formed from L2,3,4. Femoral N. Anatomy Femoral N. Anatomy Femoral N. Anatomy Key Points: Femoral N. Anatomy Key Points: VAN – vein, artery, nerve (from medial to lateral). Nerve lies on top of iliopsoas muscles. Nerve to sartorius m. exits and lies superficial and medial to main body of femoral n. Fascia Lata Note fascias lata and iliaca. Fascia iliaca lies between the artery and the nerve – thus they lie in different compartments. Femoral Nerve Cutaneous Distribution The femoral nerve supplies the anterior thigh and part of the medial thigh, then as the saphenous nerve supplies the medial aspect of the lower leg and ankle. Knee & Hip Bone Innervation Knee & Hip Bone Innervation Anterior Posterior Standard Femoral Standard Femoral Block Technique Palpate femoral artery at inguinal crease. Mark a spot 1 cm lateral to pulse. Advance needle till quadriceps twitch obtained. Issues With Standard Technique: Issues With Standard Technique: Body Size Issues With Standard Technique: Sartorious Twitch Sartorious Twitch Injection should not be done when a sartorius twitch is present, because the nerve may have already exited the sheath. Nerve to Sartorius m. Issues With Standard Technique: Injection Outside Sheath: Injection Outside Sheath: Femoral N. Ultrasound Imaging (1): Femoral N. Ultrasound Imaging (1): Positioning: Patient flat, stomach retracted with wide tape if needed. Stand on side of block, machine on opposite side. Try to line up needle, transducer, and US monitor – makes it easier to image your needle. Femoral N. Ultrasound Imaging (2): Femoral N. Ultrasound Imaging (2): Holding the Probe: Notice the hand is holding the probe in a way that the side facing us is easily visualized – making it easier to get the needle lined up with the middle of the probe. Notice that the hand is resting on the patient’s skin. This helps keep the probe from sliding around on the gel. SAX approach. Imaging: Imaging: Start below crease. Perpendicular to leg, not parallel to crease. Look for femoral artery, white triangle. No! Yes! The white triangle: The white triangle: anatomic correlations Example Images: Example Images: Lateral Medial Lateral Medial Try to identify the fascial planes and the nerve. Lateral Medial Lateral Medial Lateral Medial Fine Tuning Imaging: Slight rotational and angle adjustments of probe, to get best cross section. Move probe cephalad to find best compromise between femoral nerve image and depth. (As you move cephalad, the nerve becomes a more distinct bundle. However, it can be harder to image as it gets deeper.) Medial Lateral Medial Lateral Another example. Try to identify the fascial planes and the nerve. Medial Lateral Medial Lateral Medial Lateral Note second artery below femoral artery – the profunda femoris branch. At this location, femoral nerve is also branching out, and harder to image, so best to move more cephalad. The probe is being moved cephalad. Approaches: With Stimulation Approaches: With Stimulation IP OOP OOP IP Approaches: No Stimulation Approaches: No Stimulation Here, an 18 g Touhy needle is being used – easier to see with US, and easier to feel the 2 pops through fascias lata and iliaca. OOP IP Don’t aim for nerve. Aim to pierce fascia iliaca lateral to nerve. Feel fascial pop, then give 1 ml test dose to confirm location. OOP Geometry OOP Geometry A good goal for the OOP approach would be that your needle tip approaches the nerve at the point that the ultrasound beam intersects with the nerve. That way, you will be sure to see your test injection. You can measure depth to nerve with US, then use that information as shown. Example of In Plane Approach: Example of In Plane Approach: Example of Out of Plane Approach Example of Out of Plane Approach Note that the needle isn’t seen here, but tissue movement shows general track of the needle. Injection: Injection: More Injection: More Injection: In Plane – Outside Sheath In Plane – Outside Sheath An example of a test injection above the fascia iliaca, and probably also above the fascia lata. Out of Plane – Outside Sheath Out of Plane – Outside Sheath An example of a test injection above the fascia iliaca. One more nice example: a 16 y/o female for an ACL repair. Post injection. Even though nerve is not completely surrounded with local, the block is still usually good. Scenario: Scenario: Total Knee Replacement Preop meds: celexecob, gabapentin Spinal anesthesia Femoral single shot block vs catheter Pre or postop. Local by surgeon (helps with sciatic mediated pain). Supraclavicular Supraclavicular and Interscalene Blocks Interscalene Anatomy Interscalene Anatomy SCM Middle Scalene Anterior Scalene Omohyoid Brachial Brachial Plexus Sheath A sheath surrounds the brachial plexus, from the transverse processes all the way down into the axilla. Relations Relations Brachial plexus is contained within a fascial sheath. Subclavian artery lies medial to plexus as they cross the 1st rib together. Note location of phrenic nerve and vertebral artery. Note that either lung or rib may be visualized with US under the plexus. Typical Areas of Block Typical Areas of Block Classic Interscalene Technique (1) Classic Interscalene Technique (1) The needle is placed in the groove perpendicular to all planes, with a slight caudal angulation. The classic entry point is at the level of C6, identified by the level of the cricoid cartilage, or where the EJ crosses the SCM. Supraclavicular Block: Supraclavicular Block: Standard Technique The goal of this technique is to inject the plexus near the 1st rib, where the roots have formed into trunks. The classic technique involved walking across the 1st rib to find the plexus. This was associated with a 1­5% incidence of pneumothorax. Many authors have reported variations in technique, to try to reduce the pneumothorax risk. Issues With Standard Techniques: Issues With Standard Techniques: Body Size Issues With Standard Technique: Phrenic Nerve Phrenic Nerve Stimulation: Phrenic Nerve Anterior Scalene If you get hiccuping, you are in front of the anterior scalene. Move your needle one groove further back. Issues With Standard Technique: Posterior Muscle Contraction. Posterior Muscle Contraction. Posterior muscle contraction are from nerve that have exited the sheath, and lie behind The middle scalene. Move your needle one groove forward. Issues With Standard Technique: Phrenic Nerve Phrenic Nerve Dysfunction This occurs in 100% of successful interscalene blocks, because we have anesthetized the roots that form the phrenic nerve. It’s incidence is lower and variable in supraclavicular blocks – depends on volume of local used. Issues With Standard Technique: Injection Injection Outside Sheath: It is possible to get a good twitch and be superficial to the sheath. Injection at this location May result in block of the superficial cervical plexus. Supraclavicular Ultrasound Supraclavicular Ultrasound Imaging: Positioning: Place roll under operative shoulder to allow better access with needle. Keep needle, transducer and monitor lined up. Supraclavicular Imaging: Supraclavicular Imaging: Start parallel and adjacent to clavicle. May have to rotate probe slightly to get a good cross section. Lateral Medial Here is a nice example of the brachial plexus to the left of the subclavian artery. Lateral Medial Look for subclavian artery, with plexus sheath on lateral aspect. Look for subclavian artery, with plexus sheath on lateral aspect. Lateral Medial Interscalene Imaging: Interscalene Imaging: Scan up from supraclavicular position. Moving the probe cephalad. Posterior Anterior Look for brachial plexus bundle between scalene muscles. Look for brachial plexus bundle between scalene muscles. Posterior Anterior Supraclavicular Approach: Supraclavicular Approach: Use in­plane approach only – so position of needle relative to lung is always known. In Plane Lateral Medial Interscalene Approach: Interscalene Approach: Either in plane or out of plane approaches can be used. IP OOP Posterior Anterior Another example. Try to identify the anatomy. BP Ant Scalene Middle Scalene The brachial plexus is nicely delineated. Same patient – with inplane approach injection from the left side of the screen. The needle is not visualized, but local anesthetic can be seen entering the sheath. Local anesthetic Same patient – needle now imaged. Local anesthetic can be seen pooling around the plexus. Scenario: Scenario: Shoulder Surgery Interscalene vs supraclavicular blocks GA by LMA or ETT. Sensory Innervation for Sensory Innervation for Shoulder Surgery Brachial plexus skin innervation. Sensory Innervation for Sensory Innervation for Shoulder Surgery Cervical plexus skin innervation. Sensory Innervation for Sensory Innervation for Shoulder Surgery T2­3 skin innervation. Only occasionally required for shoulder surgery. Pros and Cons Pros and Cons IS: one injection gets full coverage, but with phrenic nerve dysfunction. SC: doesn’t get skin, but can avoid or reduce phrenic nerve dysfunction. • In elderly patients, patients with COPD, or sleep apnea, I try to reduce the risk of phrenic nerve dysfunction by using supraclavicular approach. • To anesthetize the skin, you can block the supraclavicular branches of the cervical plexus with a subcutaneous injection above the clavicle, starting at the needle entry site from the supraclavicular block. Axillary Block Axillary Block Brachial Brachial Plexus Sheath A sheath surrounds the brachial plexus, from the transverse processes all the way down into the axilla. Axillary Block: Anatomy Axillary Block: Anatomy The brachial plexus has branched into the terminal nerves as it enters the axilla. The median, radial, and ulnar nerves surround the axillary artery, within the brachial plexus sheath. The musculocutaneous nerve exits the sheath more proximally, and enters into the coraco­ brachialis muscle. Axillary Block: Cross­Sectional Anatomy Axillary Block: Cross­Sectional Anatomy Axillary Block: Cross­Sectional Anatomy Axillary Block: Cross­Sectional Anatomy Where are the nerves actually located? Where are the nerves actually located? Ulnar N. Distribution Ulnar N. Distribution Median N. Distribution Median N. Distribution Radial N. Distribution Radial N. Distribution Nerves Are Mobile: Nerves Are Mobile: With pressure on the probe, the Median n. here moved around the axillary artery. Compression of the Axillary Vein: Identifying Individual Nerves: Identifying Individual Nerves: Nerves can frequently be identified by: Their location in relation to the axillary artery. Change in position as one scans distally. Movement of nerve with flexion/extension at wrist and elbow. (See examples in the following slides) The Ulnar n. lies on the antero­inferior aspect of the axillary and brachial arteries. About halfway down the arm, it diverges away from the artery, and moves more posteriorly. Ulnar Nerve in the Axilla Ulnar Nerve in the Axilla Demonstration of ulnar nerve movement with wrist flexion and extension. The Medial n. lies on the antero­superior aspect of the axillary and brachial arteries. About halfway down the arm, it crosses the artery, and winds up medial to the artery in the antecubital fossa. Median N in the Axilla: Median N in the Axilla: Demonstration of median nerve movement with elbow flexion and extension. Anatomy: Anatomy: Radial n. Lies posterior – inferior to axillary artery. Moves posterior and wraps around humerus with profunda brachii a. As you move down the arm, the radial nerve has moved backwards towards the humerus. Radial Nerve in Axilla Radial Nerve in Axilla The radial nerve moves toward the humerus as one scans distally. The profunda artery can sometimes be seen traveling with it. Musculocutaneous N. Anatomy: Musculocutaneous N. Anatomy: Proximal to the axilla, the musculocutaneous nerve leaves the plexus sheath and enters into the corocobrachialis m. Musculocutaneous N in Axilla Musculocutaneous N in Axilla The musculocutaneous n moves away from artery as you scan distally. Step By Step Guide: Imaging Step By Step Guide: Imaging Get US image – usually a SAX view. Adjust depth, focus and gain of image. Step By Step Guide: Step By Step Guide: Identify Structures Use probe movement (compression) and color doppler to identify artery and veins. Step By Step Guide: Step By Step Guide: Plan Your Needle Trajectories Decide what your target area is, and how to get there without hitting veins, nerves and arteries. I usually inject 3 locations – posterior to artery, anterior to artery, and musculocutaneous (if needed). A “peri­ arterial technique”. N N V A N N Radial N. Approach Radial N. Approach Ulnar N. Approach Ulnar N. Approach Local injection: Median N Local injection: Median N Musculocutaneous N. Approach Musculocutaneous N. Approach The radial, median, and ulnar nerves are seen outlined with local. Popliteal Fossa Nerve Popliteal Fossa Nerve Blocks Sciatic Nerve Origin: Sciatic Nerve Origin: The sciatic nerve is formed from the sacral plexus, and is formed from L4,5 and S1,2,3. The roots divide into anterior (tibial) and posterior (common peroneal) divisions. Sciatic Nerve Anatomy Sciatic Nerve Anatomy The Sciatic nerve runs posteriorly down into the popliteal fossa. Tibial & peroneal components run in common sheath, side by side, with medial/lateral relation. At a point 7­10 cm above the posterior crease, the common peroneal and tibial nerves separate. Popliteal Fossa Anatomy Popliteal Fossa Anatomy In the popliteal fossa, the nerves lies postero­lateral to popliteal artery. Note the close association between the Common Peroneal n. and the Biceps m. tendon. These pictures demonstrate how there is variability in where the sciatic divides. Popliteal Fossa Anatomy Popliteal Fossa Anatomy Sciatic N. Cutaneous Distribution Sciatic Bone Innervation Sciatic Bone Innervation The media and lateral plantar nerves are branches of the tibial nerve. Posterior Approach: Posterior Approach: Lateral Approach: Lateral Approach: Issues With Standard Techniques Issues With Standard Techniques Variability in division of Sciatic n. Spread issues – local doesn’t spread to adequately contact each nerve. Popliteal Fossa Ultrasound Imaging: Popliteal Fossa Ultrasound Imaging: Positioning: Patient prone Stand on side of block, machine on opposite side. Imaging: Imaging: Start at crease, parallel to crease. (Nerves are at shallowest depth at this location.) Look for tibial n, centered between muscle bellies. Posterior Lateral Medial Try to identify the Tibial n. Posterior Lateral Medial Posterior Lateral Medial Posterior Lateral Medial Fine Tuning Imaging: Slight rotational and angle adjustments of probe, to get best cross section. Move probe cephalad to find merger point of peroneal and tibial nerves. Lateral Medial Sliding the probe cephalad. Lateral Medial Lateral Medial Another example. Try to identify Tibial and Peroneal n. components. Lateral Medial Same pateint, slightly more cephalad. Try to identify the nerves. Sonosite 180+ Sonosite 180+ Just to show how technology has advanced, here’s an image with our old US system. Sciatic Nerve Tricks Sciatic Nerve Tricks Lateral Medial If the patient flexes and extends foot, the sciatic nerve can be seen rotating in the popliteal fossa. Posterior Approaches: IP OOP Lateral Medial Another example. Transducer is at the level of the popliteal crease. Try to identify the anatomy. Lateral Medial Tibial n. Popliteal a. The peroneal n. can’t be definitely appreciated in this image. Lateral Medial Peroneal n. Tibial n. The probe has now been moved cephalad, and the tibial and peroneal nerves can now be seen next to each other. Lateral Medial Same patient – with in plane approach injection from the left side of the screen. The needle is not visualized, but it had been placed adjacent to the tibial n. prior to injection. Local anesthetic can be seen surrounding the sciatic branches. Approximate needle trajectory Peroneal n. Tibial n. This image was taken after 40 ml of local anesthetic was injected. Local is seen surrounding both branches of the Sciatic n. The nerve was pushed away from the needle tip by the local anesthetic injection. Lateral Approach: Lateral Approach: It is possible to image from underneath, while doing a lateral approach. However, it can be harder to image the needle with this approach. A lateral approach injection. Local is seen surrounding the nerve. Scenario: Scenario: Ankle Fracture Popliteal fossa block Saphenous n. block vs local by surgeon, if medial incision. GA via LMA or spinal. Conclusions: Conclusions: We discussed rationale for US guidance. We discussed technical aspects of US guidance. We discussed interesting findings seen with US. Reviewed anatomy. Discussed use of US in femoral, IS, SC, axillary and popliteal blocks. Resources: Resources: www.NYSORA.com St Lukes’s, NYC http://www.usra.ca Toronto http://www.neuraxiom.com/ Excellent! http://www.dhmc.org/.... Dartmouth http://www.usgraweb.hk/ Hong Kong Some bonus images follow. Sartorius m. Saphenous v. Approx. Saphenous n. Location. Cross section of the sartorius m. at a level just above the patella. Can be used to do a trans­sartorius approach to the saphenous nerve. Common peroneal n. Dorsalis pedis a. Cross section of anterior surface of foot, level of malleoli. Post tibial a. Tibial n. Cross section of medial aspect of foot, above medial malleolus. ...
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This note was uploaded on 12/16/2011 for the course BIOLOGY 101 taught by Professor Mr.wallace during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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