Assignment 2-3 HUMN305

Assignment 2-3 HUMN305 - 1Assignment 2-3 Assignment 2-3...

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1Assignment 2-3 Assignment 2-3 Cultural Interview Megan Matthews HUMN 305 E5WW Global Issues Professor Jaeger September 10, 2011
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2Assignment 2-3 I chose to interview a friend of a friend for my cultural interview. Her name is Melanie Petra Hardister. She is 33 years old and originally from Germany. She has been living in the United States for seventeen years. During the interview I asked questions about how people greeted each other, family life, dress code, education, and the type of government in Germany, as well as some other interesting things about the country. The following paragraphs are Melanie’s responses to my questions. In Germany, most people greet each other by kissing each cheek. Melanie is from Berlin, and she says that since Berlin is a “melting pot” of cultures, a lot of times people shake hands to make sure no one is offended or made to feel uncomfortable. Sometimes one would rund into the opposite problem, as to get hugged or kissed by people you don’t really want to because their culture believes that is the way of greeting. The national language is, of course, German. According to Melanie there are several different dialects of the language, as you travel through different parts of the country. The two main ones are “platt-deutsch” and “hoch-deutch”. Most of the people under the age of 50 speak English as well. They may not be fluent, but it’s enough to help an English speaking person out. The majority of the people speak 2 languages and a large part of the population speaks 3 or more languages. Fig 1, German greeting, Source:Google
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3Assignment 2-3 There has not been much change to the traditional family structure in Germany. The people there put family first, so much that their leisure time is spent with their family. Melanie says the families like to go out on outings to learn about history and culture. People in her country aren’t really active in sports, so they spend a lot of time with their kids and taking them to a lot of different activities. German weddings are basically the same as they are here in the United States for the most part, some are at a church, and some are performed at a courthouse. They also have huge receptions after the weddings! One thing they do different in Germany than here is that on the night before the wedding, they have a party called “Polter Abend” where everyone brings something made out of ceramic (e.g. plates, cups, toilets, ect.), and before they enter the party, they throw it against the wall by the front door for it to break in many pieces for good luck. The average age of marriage is between 25 and 30. It is completely acceptable to not get married at all or to get a divorce if marriage doesn’t work out. Figure 2, “Polter Abend” –Aftermath, Source: Google
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This note was uploaded on 12/17/2011 for the course HUMN 305 taught by Professor Jaeger during the Fall '11 term at Franklin.

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Assignment 2-3 HUMN305 - 1Assignment 2-3 Assignment 2-3...

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