ENGL 230 - Lecture 4

ENGL 230 - Lecture 4 - ENGL 230 Lecture 4 The York play as...

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ENGL 230 Lecture 4 The York play as a play of contrasts o Contemplation vs. activity High aesthetic distance vs. low aesthetic distance Decreases the aesthetic distance by having the actors in medieval clothing as apposed to dressing in the times of the bible More than just encouraging contemplation, the play is a perspective of Christian history which includes everything in medieval life The play begins with a bit of exposition - we are informed that Christ has been condemned to die Lines 3-5 Ye wot yourselves Could be speaking to the audience as well as the actors Invites the audience in 253-64 Jesus also addresses the audience All the men that walk in the street take notice that there is no other suffering besides mine - how does your suffering compare to mine? There is no suffering that compares to his The end of this monologue is paraphrasing a passage in the Bible Christ's silence on the cross is an example of his contemplative nature Luke 10:38-42 - Story of Mary and Martha Mary has chosen the life contemplative which is better than the active life o Silence vs. noise Compare Jesus's passivity to the cruelty of the soldiers
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This note was uploaded on 12/17/2011 for the course ENGL 230 taught by Professor Hurley during the Fall '07 term at McGill.

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ENGL 230 - Lecture 4 - ENGL 230 Lecture 4 The York play as...

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