16 - Law of Corrections-Hands-off doctrine-Justice Frankfurter writing in Gore vs U.S(1958-Cooper vs Pate Prisoner access to court-Section 1983

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11/16/10 Law of Corrections -Hands-off doctrine -Justice Frankfurter, writing in Gore vs. U.S. (1958) -Cooper vs. Pate Prisoner access to court -Section 1983 cases became most popular way to bring action against prison officials -improvement in prison conditions -return of property -compensation for abuse by officers -other means of access: Habeas corps petitions -asks court to examine the legality of their imprisonment -habeas petitions about as common as Sec. 1983 cases -prisoner-inspired litigation in federal courts increased -218 in 1966 -41,952 in 1996 -now around 23,000 -1996- congress limited time within which prisoners could file habeous Turner v. Calley (1987) Ban on correspondence upheld because it “related to legitimate penological interests” -current standard for the analysis of prisoners’ first amendment claims and all other constitutional claims -rational basis test -authorities must show logical connection between restriction and legitimate interest it’s
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This note was uploaded on 12/17/2011 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Chapman during the Spring '11 term at Arcadia University.

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16 - Law of Corrections-Hands-off doctrine-Justice Frankfurter writing in Gore vs U.S(1958-Cooper vs Pate Prisoner access to court-Section 1983

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