Milgram experiment anecdote

Milgram experiment anecdote - Dean Search Professor Robbins...

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Dean Search Professor Robbins Psychology 22 November 2010 Milgram Experiment A psychologist from Yale University named Stanley Milgram conducted the Milgram obedience experiment. He wanted to see the participant’s willingness to obey an authority figure while testing their moral conscience. In the experiment they were told that they would be either a “teacher” or a “learner” and would be randomly be assigned to either role. However unbeknownst to them all the slips said teacher and people aware of the study acted like they got the learner slip. The teacher was given a list of words that he read to the learner. The learner was supposed to memorize these pairings. After reading the list the teacher went back and said only the first word of each pair and then read four possible choices of what the other word was. The learner had to choose out of these four by pressing a button. If he was wrong the teacher shocked him. The shocks went up in fifteen-volt increments for each wrong answer.
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This note was uploaded on 12/17/2011 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Chapman during the Spring '11 term at Arcadia University.

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Milgram experiment anecdote - Dean Search Professor Robbins...

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