Brashares 2004 - Fish and Bushmeat - Science

Brashares 2004 - Fish and Bushmeat - Science - Bushmeat...

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DOI: 10.1126/science.1102425 , 1180 (2004); 306 Science et al. Justin S. Brashares, Supply in West Africa Bushmeat Hunting, Wildlife Declines, and Fish www.sciencemag.org (this information is current as of December 15, 2008 ): The following resources related to this article are available online at http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/306/5699/1180 version of this article at: including high-resolution figures, can be found in the online Updated information and services, http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/306/5699/1180/DC1 can be found at: Supporting Online Material found at: can be related to this article A list of selected additional articles on the Science Web sites http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/306/5699/1180#related-content http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/306/5699/1180#otherarticles , 2 of which can be accessed for free: cites 10 articles This article 40 article(s) on the ISI Web of Science. cited by This article has been http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/306/5699/1180#otherarticles 5 articles hosted by HighWire Press; see: cited by This article has been http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection/ecology Ecology : subject collections This article appears in the following http://www.sciencemag.org/about/permissions.dtl in whole or in part can be found at: this article permission to reproduce of this article or about obtaining reprints Information about obtaining registered trademark of AAAS. is a Science 2004 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science; all rights reserved. The title Copyright American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1200 New York Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20005. (print ISSN 0036-8075; online ISSN 1095-9203) is published weekly, except the last week in December, by the Science on December 15, 2008 www.sciencemag.org Downloaded from
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ity of change) of how bioturbation changes following extinction depend on the order in which species are lost, because extinction risk is frequently correlated with life-history traits that determine the intensity of bio- turbation. This finding is important because it argues that the particular cause of extinc- tion ultimately governs the ecosystem-level consequences of biodiversity loss. Therefore, if we are to predict the ecological impacts of extinction and if we hope to protect coastal environments from human activities that disrupt the ecological functions species perform, we will need to better understand why species are at risk and how this risk covaries with their functional traits. References and Notes 1. G. C. B. Poore, G. D. F. Wilson, Nature 361 , 597 (1993). 2. P. G. Falkowski et al. , Science 281 , 200 (1998). 3. P. Vitousek, H. Mooney, J. Lubchenco, J. Melillo, Science 277 , 494 (1997). 4. R. E. Turner, N. N. Rabalais,
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Brashares 2004 - Fish and Bushmeat - Science - Bushmeat...

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