American Negotiating Behavior

American Negotiating Behavior - American Negotiating...

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American Negotiating Behavior: Questions and Answers Contact: Meaghan Pierannunzi, USIP Press 202-429-4736; [email protected] 1. What is the Cross-Cultural Negotiation project and series? In the early 1990s, the United States Institute of Peace initiated a series of conceptual and country-specific assessments on the theme of cross-cultural negotiating (CCN) behavior. In addition to the present volume, twelve book-length studies have since been published. Three of these are conceptual studies ( Negotiating across Cultures; Culture and Conflict Resolution; Arts of Power ). Seven focus on individual countries (Iran, China, Russia, North Korea, Japan, France, Germany), and two explore specific bilateral negotiating relationships (the Israeli-Palestinian and the Indian-Pakistani relationships). These books reflect the Institute’s conviction that negotiating approaches to international conflict resolution, as well as less adversarial diplomatic or business encounters, will achieve greater success when negotiators from different nations and cultures better “read” the intentions of their counterparts across a green baize table. Future country studies are in the works, including one on Pakistan. The rationale for comparing negotiating behaviors across cultures is straightforward: negotiating is a preferred method of international problem solving, governments manage and conduct negotiations in different ways, and knowledge of those differences will allow official to better prepare for and manage negotiating encounters. 2. Does culture affect the negotiation process? While some claim that culture is irrelevant in international diplomacy, almost all practitioners disagree. Diplomats have long shared a professional and international culture. Many experienced negotiators, both American and non-American, also see another culture at work: national cultures. This book is particularly concerned with the intersection of America’s national culture and its institutional culture (i.e., the structures, norms, and behavioral predispositions of U.S. government agencies such as the State Department, especially the Foreign Service). This book contends that the shared national background and institutional context of U.S. negotiators does exert a significant and recognizable impact on many facets of negotiating encounters and that the behavior of American negotiators reflects to some degree American cultural influences. 3. Why is the time ripe for a study on American negotiating behavior? Why is this volume
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This note was uploaded on 12/17/2011 for the course B.A 13 taught by Professor Cr during the Spring '11 term at Haverford.

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American Negotiating Behavior - American Negotiating...

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