appendix-r - Appendix R Recursive Backtracking (beta)...

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Appendix R Recursive Backtracking (beta) Copyright © 2011 by Stuart Reges and Marty Stepp Q.1 Backtracking Concepts Q.2 Code Example: Eight Queens Q.3 Programming Project: Anagrams Introduction In this appendix we discuss a new topic known as backtracking . It is a particular approach to problem solving that is nicely expressed using recursion. As a result, it is sometimes referred to as recursive backtracking . Recursive backtracking involves exploring a possibly very large space of choices and solutions to solve an overall problem. Backtracking is very effective when we want to try all possible choices, possibly in some targeted order, until we find the answer(s) we are seeking. Q.1 Backtracking Concepts The idea behind backtracking is that there is some solution space of possible answers that you want to explore. We try to view the problem as a sequence of choices , which allows us to think of the solution space as a decision tree . At the top of the tree we have the first choice with all of the possibilities underneath: choice #1 | +----------------+-------+--------+----------------+ . .. | | | | 1st possibility 2nd possibility 3rd possibility 4th possibility Each choice we might make at the top of the tree leaves us in a different part of the solution space. From there, we consider all possible second choices we might make. For example, if for choice #1 we chose the 3rd possibility, then we'd have to consider the choices we could make from there: choice #1 | +----------------+-------+--------+----------------+ . .. | | | | 1st possibility 2nd possibility 3rd possibility 4th possibility choice #2 | +----------------+-------+--------+----------------+ . ..
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| | | | 1st possibility 2nd possibility 3rd possibility 4th possibility It's difficult to provide a good picture of a large decision tree, because there is a fanning out at the top of the tree into several possibilities and from each of those there is a fanning out of possibilities, and from each of those there is a fanning out of possibilities and so on. So the decision tree is potentially gigantic. R.2 Coding Example: 8 Queens A classic example of backtracking is the problem known as "8 queens". The challenge is to place eight queens on a chessboard so that no two queens threaten each other. Queens can move horizontally, vertically or diagonally, so it is a real challenge to find a way to put 8 different queens on the board so that no two of them are in the same row, column or diagonal. The simplest way to think of this in terms of a decision tree is to imagine all the places you might put a first queen. There are 64 of them because the chess board is an 8 by 8 board. So at the top of the tree, there are 64 different choices you could make for placing the first queen. Then once you've placed one queen, there are 63 squares left to choose from for the second
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appendix-r - Appendix R Recursive Backtracking (beta)...

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