Fitzhugh_1854

Fitzhugh_1854 - Give Me Liberty! Sources of Freedom History...

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Give Me Liberty! Sources of Freedom History Center Sources of Freedom: George Fitzhugh on the Sociology of the South (1854) In this selection, proslavery lawyer George Fitzhugh mounted a radical defense of the slaveowner as the "least selfish of men." According to Fitzhugh, the slaveowner stood at the head of a large family of women, children, and slaves and toiled to provide for all of his dependents. Compare this account with the slave autobiographies also presented in this chapter. Can you reconcile the two pictures of plantation life? How does Fitzhugh justify the subordination of African-Americans, even the adult males who, if white, he would have expected to be masters of their own families? There is no rivalry, no competition to get employment among slaves, as among free laborers. Nor is there a war between master and slave. The master's interest prevents his reducing the slaves' allowance or wages in infancy or sickness, for he might lose the slave by so doing. His feeling for his slave never permits him to stint him in old age. The slaves
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This note was uploaded on 12/16/2011 for the course AMH 2041 taught by Professor Mungary during the Fall '11 term at FIU.

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Fitzhugh_1854 - Give Me Liberty! Sources of Freedom History...

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