LECTURE 6 - Social Inequality, Age, Gender, Ethnicity, Vulnerable Populations

LECTURE 6 - Social Inequality, Age, Gender, Ethnicity, Vulnerable Populations

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Social Inequality: Age, Gender, Race/Ethnicity, and Vulnerable Populations (Immigrant & Aboriginal Health) HSS3321 B: Sociology of Health *Information is taken from Chapter 6 in Health, Illness, and Medicine in Canada (2008) by J. N. Clarke (and from other sources where indicated) *Original Presentations Developed by: Professors Miriam Levitt & Gaetan Girard Current Lecture Adapted/Developed by Professor: Dr. Sonia Gulati
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Information is taken from Chapter 6: Health, Illness, and Medicine in Canada. Clarke 2008 Topics to be Covered § How illness and death rates vary depending on social-structural conditions such as age, gender, race, ethnicity, immigrant/aboriginal status, and geographical location. § Various explanations for differential morbidity and mortality between age, gender, and race groups.
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PART 1: SOCIAL-STRUCTURAL POSITIONS AND HEALTH: AGE, GENDER, RACE, AND ETHNICITY
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Information is taken from Chapter 6: Health, Illness, and Medicine in Canada. Clarke 2008 Social determinants of health are differentially distributed across: Ø Age Ø Gender Ø Racialized groups Ø Ethnicity Social-Structural Positions and Health
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Information is taken from Chapter 6: Health, Illness, and Medicine in Canada. Clarke 2008 Life expectancy rates are improving due to: - Decline in infant mortality rates - Decline in women’s mortality rates (i.e., due to improved nutrition and public health measures for pregnant women) Women’s life expectancy has increased more than men’s. However, while women can expect to live longer than men, they have much higher rates of disability and illness. A handful of health problems are reported more often by men and are often causes of fatality - High cholesterol and obesity are higher among men, and these conditions are associated with heart disease. Life Expectancy
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Why is it that men today live shorter lives than women? Information is taken from Chapter 6: Health, Illness, and Medicine in Canada. Clarke 2008
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Information is taken from Chapter 6: Health, Illness, and Medicine in Canada. Clarke 2008 Women can expect to live longer than men, but a higher percentage of women will experience some disability Ø Women experience more frequent illnesses and disabilities but these are not typically life-threatening Ø Men experience more life-threatening diseases, more permanent disabilities, and more earlier deaths Marriage and family protect men more than women - E.g., from engaging in risky behaviours including drug use, excessive alcohol consumption Illness and death in women and female children are also associated with their living conditions (e.g., impoverished conditions) Ø Factors that contribute to illness and death: Lack of access to essential nutrients; Lack of social support; Lack of prenatal care Gender and Health, Illness & Disability
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§ Women who smoke are more likely to develop lung cancer than men who smoke the same number of cigarettes § Diabetes is the only 1 of 7 chronic diseases that is reported
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This note was uploaded on 12/18/2011 for the course HSS 3321 B taught by Professor Dr.soniagulati during the Spring '11 term at University of Ottawa.

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LECTURE 6 - Social Inequality, Age, Gender, Ethnicity, Vulnerable Populations

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