Analyzing Messages.Baez

Analyzing Messages.Baez - Running Header: ANALYZING...

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Running Header: ANALYZING MESSAGES 1 Analyzing Messages Luis E. Baez COMM/470 October 15, 2010 Dr. Stephen Mendonca
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ANALYZING MESSAGES 2 Abstract Effective communication in the business world requires face-to-face interaction so that there are no misunderstandings or miscommunication. In today’s business world, mergers, acquisitions, and global partnerships makes it difficult to always communicate this way. There are quite a few different forms of technological communication tools that allow us to interface. Some of the more popular are PDA’s, facsimiles, cell phone, video-conferencing and e-mail that allows us to communicate with anyone, at anytime and anywhere in the world. Ensuring that the message comes across as stated or written is one of the major drawbacks of modern technology. I will present some examples of communication and analyze the effectiveness of one of these messages by using the communication process. By following these techniques, most messages can be delivered and its content will be interpreted accurately and effectively, without the need to be face to face.
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ANALYZING MESSAGES 3 Analyzing Messages In business, people communicate in many different ways. Face-to-face communication takes place during one-on-one discussions, in informal groups, and during meetings (McKenney & Roebuck, 2006). When individuals communicate face-to-face, they experience the most effective form of communication (McKenney & Roebuck, 2006). An essential byproduct of face-to-face communication is immediate feedback. Other forms of communication utilized by individuals or groups are orally on the telephone, videoconferencing during presentations, and in writing using desktop computers or terminals to compose letters, e-mails, memos, and reports. Because communication influences organizations in major ways, the communication process must be examined in greater detail. Communication Process McKenney & Roebuck, (2006), state that the Communication Process increases the effectiveness of the communicator. There are 5 major components to the communication process, if properly utilized, will enhance the effectiveness of the message no matter what form of technology is used. Sender or Encoder The sender initiates a communication and determines the intent of the message, how to send it, and what, if any, response are required (McKenney & Roebuck, 2006). The sender bears the burden in this process, communicating not only the content of the message, but information Receiver or Decoder
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ANALYZING MESSAGES 4 Receivers comprise the target audience of a message transmitted by the sender. The message the sender encodes may not be the message received, as receivers interpret messages based upon their frame of reference (McKenney & Roebuck, 2006). This frame of reference includes their life experiences, cultural background, and the values and beliefs they hold. Because these filters may adversely affect the intent of the sender, some feedback must occur to
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This note was uploaded on 12/19/2011 for the course COMM 470 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Texas A&M.

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Analyzing Messages.Baez - Running Header: ANALYZING...

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