Conflict Resolution Paper. Team E

Conflict Resolution Paper. Team E - Running head: CONFLICT...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Running head: CONFLICT RESOLUTION 1 Conflict Resolution Team E Eddie Baez, Denise Bims, Lorenzo Dickson, Darrel Smith, Christy Turner PSY/430 January 13, 2010 Dr. Donald R. Collins
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CONFLICT RESOLUTION 2 Conflict Resolution Team Building has several aspects. One major aspect is the challenges of facing conflicts and evaluating possible solutions. Once a problem is identified, there are several conflict management and problem-solving techniques that help facilitate the group process to the stage of implementing a solution. Identified Conflict In all new classes at the University of Phoenix, students are required to participate in learning teams and to pick their teammates. On June 23, 2010, the professor announced that the class needed to assemble their groups. The group was amazed by individuals requesting to be part of team C’s group. Usually, the teams consist of no more than five members. When the team election process was completed, the instructor approved of nine individuals on team C. At first, it did not seem to be a major issue until the team project was due. While trying to distribute work among the group, we realized that there was a conflict in the organization and planning process that the new members were familiar and not familiar with. The conflict regarding agreement on the approach and process to accomplishing assignment fell into the area of procedural conflict (Engleberg & Wynn, 2010). With nine members engaged, the main concerns were how to do the project and who would do what portion of the project. Only four questions were required in the project (group paper), and it needed to be decided who would implement the necessary work specified in the syllabus. With nine people involved with the team, we understood that there were too many individuals involved in such a small team project; therefore, the team decided to direct attention at minimizing the stress factor that had occurred because of the overload of team members in the group. According to Garrision, Leidner & Wakefield (2008), “Task conflict arises when task knowledge-an understanding of the necessary activities to reach team goals- is not fully understood or shared by team members. The
Background image of page 2
CONFLICT RESOLUTION 3 result may be disagreements among members about work content, appropriate tasks, or assignment of team activities” (p. 436). Team C was focused on accomplishing the task productively and effectively with so many people participating in the project. Applying Personal Strengths
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/19/2011 for the course PSYC 430 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas A&M.

Page1 / 7

Conflict Resolution Paper. Team E - Running head: CONFLICT...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online