MAT116Week5DQ2 - of the second coordinates are the same. It...

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Daily Question 2: An ordered pair consists of the following things written in this order 1. A left parentheses “(“ 2. A number, called the first coordinate, or the x-coordinate 3. A comma 4. A number, called the second coordinate, or the y-coordinate 5. A right parentheses “)” Here are some examples of ordered pairs: (7,4); (8,8); (5,1); (7,0); (0,0)etc. A function is a set of ordered pairs, enclosed between braces {} such that no two have the same first coordinate or x-coordinate. It does not matter if two have the same second coordinate or y- coordinate. It would still be a function as long as no two first coordinates are the same. Here is a set of ordered pairs which model a function: {(7,2); (1,1); (8,1); (4,2); (3,11)} It models a function because all the first coordinates are different. It does not matter that some
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Unformatted text preview: of the second coordinates are the same. It would still model a function whether any of the second coordinates were the same or not. All we have to do to change the set of ordered pairs so that it does not model a function is to change one or more of the numbers so that two will have the same first coordinates. Like this: (7,2); (1,1); (8,1); (4,2); (1,11) I changed the last ordered pair (3,11) to (1,11). That keeps the set of five ordered pairs from modeling a function because it now has two ordered pairs with the same first coordinate, 1. You can make them up by the hundreds. Just put two or more ordered pairs in it that have the same first coordinate, so that it will not model a function. You can tell why it does not model a function by telling which first coordinates are the same....
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This note was uploaded on 12/18/2011 for the course MATH 116 MAT/116 taught by Professor Jefferson during the Spring '11 term at University of Phoenix.

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