Lecture 3. Chewing and Swallowing

Lecture 3. Chewing and Swallowing - Lecture 3: Chewing You...

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Lecture 3: Chewing
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You are a donut!
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Mouth Anus
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Nasty Jungle
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parasympathetic
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Salivary Glands Function: (a) lubricate (b) antibacterial
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NURSING BOTTLE SYNDROME Teeth of a 25 month old bottle-fed baby Sleep suppresses rate of salivary flow.
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NURSING BOTTLE SYNDROME
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Tooth Truths 1. Tooth Decay was uncommon prior to 1886. a. Year Coca Cola (Coke) began mass marketing campaign. b. Prior to Coke, sweets were eaten only a meals. (1) Only two or three meals were eaten (a) Low in sugar, high in fat (b) Agrarian Society (2) Only rich, suffered from tooth decay (a) Sugar expensive (b) Queen Elizabeth I was famous for her black teeth (3) Most people lost their teeth due to gum disease (poor hygiene) c. Epidemics of tooth decay began after sugar sodas were marketed and did not decline until early 1960, when fluoridation of water began
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Tooth Truths 1. Tooth Decay is caused by acids produced by bacteria in the mouth a. Sugars in soda and foods to stick together to form plaque (1) Allows further metabolism of sugars by bacteria (a) Cause bathing of tooth in acid (i) Allows calcium to be released from tooth (2) Allows anaerobic bacteria to grow.
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This note was uploaded on 12/18/2011 for the course NS 1150 taught by Professor Levitsky during the Fall '05 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Lecture 3. Chewing and Swallowing - Lecture 3: Chewing You...

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