{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Cellular Respiration - Cytoskeleton The cytoskeleton is a...

Info icon This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cellular Respiration Cellular respiration refers to the chemical reactions that break down glucose to CO 2 and H 2 O, releasing the energy stored within its bonds. The energy is temporarily stored in the bonds of ATP (adenosine triphosphate). ADP + P i + energy ATP This process requires oxygen in aerobic organisms. Anaerobic organisms do not require oxygen, but produce much less ATP per glucose molecule. Aerobic cellular respiration occurs in the mitochondria . Prokaryotes do not have mitochondria. Click here to view the chapter on cellular respiration. Mitochondria Mitochondria have an external membrane and an inner membrane with numerous folds called cristae . The cristae that project into the gel-like matrix. Enzymes involved in cellular respiration are found in the matrix and embedded in the membrane of the cristae.
Image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Cytoskeleton The cytoskeleton is a network of protein elements that extend through the cytoplasm in eukaryotic cells. It provides for the distinctive shape of cells such as red blood cells , muscle cells , and nerve cells (neurons). It produces movement of cells and is associated with movement of materials within cells. It is composed of three types of protein fibers: microtubules , actin filaments , and intermediate filaments . The general function of each of these is listed in the table below. Cytoskeleton Element General Function Microtubules Move materials within the cell Move the cilia and flagella Actin Filaments Move the cell Intermediate Filaments Provides mechanical support...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern