Mechanism of operation of the

Mechanism of operation of the - Mechanism of operation of...

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Mechanism of operation of the Sodium-Potassium Pump The diagrams below illustrate the mechanism of operation of the sodium-potassium pump. In these diagrams, orange is used to represent the pump protein. Circles are used to represent sodium ions and squares are used to represent potassium ions. Notice that the pump has three sodium binding sites and two potassium binding sites. Three sodium ions enter the pump. ATP bonds to the pump.
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One phosphate bond in the ATP molecule breaks, releasing its energy to the pump protein. The pump protein changes shape, releasing the sodium ions to the outside. The two potassium binding sites are also exposed to the outside, allowing two potassium ions to enter the pump. When the phosphate group detaches from the pump, the pump returns to its original shape. The two potassium ions leave and three sodium ions enter. The cycle then repeats itself.
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Examples of Active Transport Plants move minerals (inorganic ions) into their roots by active transport.
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Mechanism of operation of the - Mechanism of operation of...

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