Quaternary structure

Quaternary structure - Quaternary structure Some proteins...

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Quaternary structure Some proteins contain two or more polypeptide chains that associate to form a single protein. These proteins have quaternary structure. For example, hemoglobin contains four polypeptide chains. Denaturation Denaturation occurs when the normal bonding patterns are disturbed causing the shape of the protein to change. This can be caused by changes in temperature, pH , or salt concentration. For example, acid causes milk to curdle and heat (cooking) causes egg whites to coagulate because the proteins within them denature. If the protein is not severely denatured, it may regain its normal structure. Other Kinds of Proteins Simple proteins contain only amino acids. Conjugated proteins contain other kinds of molecules. For example, glycoproteins contain carbohydrates, nucleoproteins contain nucleic acids, and lipoproteins contain lipids. Nucleic acids DNA DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is the genetic material. An important function of DNA is top store information regarding the sequence of amino acids in each of the body’s proteins. This "list" of
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course BIO BSC1010 taught by Professor Gwenhauner during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Quaternary structure - Quaternary structure Some proteins...

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