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Greek philosopher - objects.Plato'. ,

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G reek philosopher-scientists set themselves the task  of envisioning the universe as a set of physical  objects. Plato's pupil Aristotle came to dominate thinking in this field. Where Platonists thought in terms of  the idealized mathematics of two-dimensional circles, the Aristotelians envisioned actual three- dimensional spheres. Aristotle taught that rotating spheres carried the Moon, Sun, planets, and stars around a stationary Earth.  The Earth was unique because of its central position and its material composition. All generation and  corruption occurred in the "sublunar" region, below the Moon and above the Earth. This region was  composed of the four elements: earth, water, air, and fire. Beyond the Moon was the unchanging and  perfect celestial region. It was composed of a mysterious fifth element. 
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