New kinds of particles might be needed to answer an old question of

New kinds of particles might be needed to answer an old question of

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Unformatted text preview: New kinds of particles might be needed to answer an old question of "missing matter." Back in the 1930s, astronomer Fritz Zwicky had measured velocities of galaxies in clusters and announced that the clusters should fly apart. The gravitational pull of the visible matter was not enough to hold the fast-moving galaxies together. Other astronomers thought some simple explanation would eventually turn up, perhaps an error in the observations. But in the 1970s, when Vera Rubin with W.K. Ford measured the rotations of individual galaxies, to their surprise they discovered the same problem. The outer stars were orbiting so fast that they should fly off, if nothing held them but the gravitational pull of the visible stars. Studies by other methods confirmed that we see only about 10 percent of the mass in the universe. The observations and calculations from big bang theory only hint at the remaining 90 percent. Some The observations and calculations from big bang theory only hint at the remaining 90 percent....
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