Copernicu1 - Copernicus' heliocentric universe One such...

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Copernicus' heliocentric universe One such astronomer, Nicolaus Copernicus (lived 1473--1543 C.E.), found many deficiencies in the Ptolemaic model. He felt that any model of the planet motions must account for the observations and have circular, uniform motion. The Ptolemaic model did not do that. Also, the Ptolemaic model was not elegant and, therefore, ``un-Godlike''. During the years between Ptolemy and Copernicus, many small epicycles had been added to the main epicycles to make Ptolemy's model agree with the observations. By Copernicus' time, the numerous sub-epicycles and offsets had made the Ptolemaic model very complicated. Surely, God would have made a cleaner more elegant universe! Copernicus was strongly influenced by neoplatonism (beliefs that combined elements of Christianity and Platonism) in developing a model to replace Ptolemy's. This led him to believe that the Sun is a material copy of God---God is the creative force sustaining life and the Sun gives us warmth and light. He adopted Aristarchus'
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Copernicu1 - Copernicus' heliocentric universe One such...

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